Autonomous Individual

Abolish hierarchy and oppression! Embrace mutual aid, worker ownership, free association, and decentralized systems.

kropotkitten:

A Kurdish news agency has published an interview with one of the Istanbul anarchists who are taking part in the defence of Kobanê against the Daesh / Isis assault. 

"Whoever calls themselves a revolutionary should feel each bullet fired at Kobane as a bullet fired at themselves, so its our call to everyone, primarily to all the revolutionaries, to defend the resistance of Kobane".

——

Revolutionary Anarchist Action at the border guard 

Revolutionary Anarchist Action (DAF/Devrimci Anarşist Faaliyet) is taking part in ongoing people’s resistance at the Kobanê border. DAF members are making a call, stating “Whoever calls themselves a revolutionary should feel each bullet fired at Kobane as a bullet fired at themselves, and should defend Kobane”.

To defend the Kobane resistance, different organizations from different sections are taking place at the guard action along 25km long border. DAF members are among them.

Revolutionary Anarchist Action member A. Melik Yalçın that joined the border guard thats been going on for 6 days, stated that they joined the action at Kobane border because they see the Kobane struggle as the struggle of oppressed.

"ISIS mobs will lose against the freedom fighters. Struggle of our comrades that resist in Kobane is a heritage from Kawas that resisted Dehaks. We too, will continue walking on this way of our comrades" stated Yalçın, adding that communal life during the guard action is important for them, and they gained mutual experience during the resistance guard.

Yalçın stated “Whoever calls themselves a revolutionary should feel each bullet fired at Kobane as a bullet fired at themselves, so its our call to everyone, primarily to all the revolutionaries, to defend the resistance of Kobane”.

Source: Ajansa Nûçeyan a Fırat URFA/ANF 29.09.2014 08:17:20
http://www.firatnews.com/news/guncel/devrimci-anarsistler-de-nobet-eyleminde.htm

(Source: scaredykropotkitten, via class-struggle-anarchism)

sonofbaldwin:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

dhaarijmens:

bemusedlybespectacled:

washingtonpost:

In a post-Ferguson world, Americans increasingly doubt the notion of colorblind justice.

HOW THE FUCK DID THE PERCENTAGE GO UP FOR WHITE PEOPLE

IN WHAT UNIVERSE DOES A POLICE OFFICER SHOOTING AN UNARMED BLACK KID (AND THEN ATTEMPTING TO COVER IT UP AFTER THE FACT) CONSTITUTE EQUAL TREATMENT IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM

LIKE WHO LOOKS AT THAT AND GOES “WELL, BEFORE I THOUGHT THAT THERE WAS RACISM IN OUR JUSTICE SYSTEM, BUT THEN THIS SHIT HAPPENED AND NOW I SEE THAT IT’S PERFECTLY EQUAL”

WHAT THE FUCK

This increase can be explained by an interesting social phenomenon called ‘denial.’

They benefit from not knowing.. and from believing in myths. 

Comparing beliefs before and after Michael Brown’s murder and the surrounding revelations of racism that have sprung out of it, white people, as a demographic believe, MORE THAN EVER BEFORE, that the criminal justice system treats whites and blacks equally.

That is, MORE white people believe the criminal justice system treats black equally now than they did before Michael Brown’s death.

In essence, for white people, blatant systemic oppression and the murder of an unarmed young black man gives them even more reason to believe blacks are treated fairly by the system.

This confirms an earlier study that said the more you tell white people that the system is inherently racist, the more they supported harsher punishments for black people: http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/08/07/3468368/study-white-people-support-harsher-criminal-laws-if-they-think-more-black-people-are-arrested/

Marinate on these inhumanities for a second.

(via classwaru)

anarcho-queer:

Kudo’s to this brave activist^^

During today’s ‘Flood Wall Street’ protest, he climbed a phone booth and led some anti-capitalist chants. 

He gave a small speech about being a member of the IWW and demanded that the working class and organize and take total control over the means of production. Soon after, the NYPD pointed him out to be arrested.

Over 20 officers piled on top of him and brutalized the activist in front of a dozen news camera’s. It was the first official arrest of the day.

His arrest led protesters to chant anti-police slogans and to remove the barricades that surrounded us.

(A video of the arrest will be posted shortly).

(via anarchistpeopleofcolor)

america-wakiewakie:

How Many Women are in Prison for Defending Themselves Against Domestic Violence? | Bitch Magazine 

Marissa Alexander was sentenced to prison after firing a warning shot to protect herself from her abusive husband.

Last week, domestic violence was front-page news in America as the video of Baltimore Ravens player Ray Rice beating his partner circulated online. Sunday morning news shows interviewed domestic violence survivors, social workers at domestic violence agencies, and even police chiefs about their departments’ policies around domestic violence calls.

But in all this discussion about the realities of domestic violence, one perspective was clearly left out: the people who are imprisoned for defending themselves against abusers. Where are the stories about how the legal system often punishes abuse survivors for defending themselves, usually after the legal system itself failed to ensure their safety?

Many readers already know the name Marissa Alexander, the Florida mother of three who was arrested for firing a warning shot to dissuade her abusive husband from assaulting her. In 2012, Alexander was found guilty of aggravated assault and was given a 20 year sentence. Her sentencing coincided with the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, drawing wider public attention than she might have received otherwise. People across the country rallied to her defense, organizing fundraisers and teach-ins and bringing media attention to the injustice of her case. Alexander appealed her case and was granted a new trial, which is scheduled to start in December 2014. The prosecutor has said that, this time, she will seek a sixty-year sentence for Alexander if she is convicted again.

While awaiting her new legal ordeal, Marissa Alexander is allowed to be home with two of her three children. (Her estranged husband, the same one who had assaulted her and then called the police on her, has custody of her youngest child.) If it weren’t for that outpouring of support nationwide, Marissa Alexander might very well still be in prison on that original twenty-year sentence.

We know Marissa Alexander’s name, but there are countless other abuse survivors behind prison walls whose names and stories we do not know. We actually do not know how many women are imprisoned for defending themselves against their abusers. No agency or organization seems to keep track of this information. Prison systems do not. Court systems do not. The U.S. Department of Justice has some data on intimate partner violence, but not about how often this violence is a significant factor in the woman’s incarceration. In California, a prison study found that 93 percent of the women who had killed their significant others had been abused by them. That study found that 67 percent of those women reported that they had been attempting to protect themselves or their children when they wound up killing their partner. In New York State, 67 percent of women sent to prison for killing someone close to them were abused by that person. But these are just two specific studies; no governmental agency collects data on how frequently abuse plays a direct role to prison nationwide.

This past Sunday morning, an ABC news segment reported that 70 percent of domestic violence calls do not end in prosecution. That story stressed how many abused people choose not to press charges against their loved ones. Not mentioned, however, is how often systems fail to help survivors when they doseek help. Domestic violence survivors have reported that, time and again, they sought help—from family members, from their communities, from domestic violence agencies and from police. Many times, they found that help was unavailable to them. As we collectively wring our hands about domestic violence, shelters for people seeking help remain grossly underfunded. Passing the Violence Against Women Act (which relies heavily on criminalization and arrest, both problematic for women of color and other marginalized people) required a monumental political effort. 

(Read Full Text)

(via ragemovement)

blackboybe:

(video)

Genocide is defined by the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide as “any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such: killing members of the group; causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; [and] forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.” 

(via madrantings)

A discussion on the failure of non-violence. 

How To Talk To Babies About Marxist Theory

  • BABY: [builds tower with blocks]
  • ME: ok this is very good
  • under capitalism massive building projects are constructed through wage slavery
  • and through their sheer size and scale intimidate and pacify the masses
  • so this is a great comment
  • BABY: [knocks over tower]
  • ME: that’s right

Fixed. theme by Andrew McCarthy